Dating midlife relationship

Ask about his interests and how he spends his time, and share the same information about yourself with him. Try to make the outing entertaining and interesting -- for both of you.

Jonathan Rosenfeld suggests that people view dating as an adventure.

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Experts warn not to take risks, no matter how convincing your partner may be.

If the date is a disaster, you'll have someone to commiserate with. This is not the time to discuss your favorite baby names or your ongoing feud with your ex.

And if it's great - you'll have someone to celebrate with. There will be plenty of time for such discussions if you continue dating, but a first meeting should be light and breezy. Don't pressure yourself into deciding if this is the person you want to grow old with -- remember, its just coffee!

There is no guarantee that you are going to like your sister-in-law's newly divorced first cousin, of course, but the connection ensures that your date is not a complete unknown. Arrange to meet at a café or restaurant rather than at your home or his. For your first meeting, it is best to arrange a coffee date rather than a dinner or an afternoon at a museum.

Once you've made a connection -- either online, through friends, or by striking up a conversation with someone in the grocery store -- and you've arranged to get together, there are some important things to remember. If you have made a connection online and know nothing about your date, you may want to be extra cautious by letting a friend know where you will be meeting and at what time. If you don't seem to be hitting it off, it's easier for both parties when there's a quick escape route!

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